What can the tech bubble learn from the art bubble?

Big-oil-bubble-karamay-3[2]

James writes:

What can the tech bubble learn from the art bubble? I offer some thoughts in this piece by Gary Sernovitz in The New Yorker.

The art world knows about prices floating ever higher on abstraction and hope. The resonances aren’t completely coincidental. Both venture capitalists and art buyers are in the business of valuing the invaluable. Both stake their reputations on exquisite selection. Both nurture talent before it can support itself. Both have a soft spot for youth, for unbowed ego, for the myth of solitary genius, for the next new thing. Both operate in a world of frustratingly limited information and maddeningly unpredictable success. Both depend on consumer culture while holding themselves superior to it. And both the art market and venture investing have become increasingly winner-take-all games, with more clout to the companies and artists backed by the most powerful dealers or venture capitalists.

Complete article here.

 


Critic's Pick: Steve Mumford at Postmasters

 

Anbar_lg
Steve Mumford, "Anbar" 2016, oil on linen, 60 x 96 inches


James writes: 

My Critic's Pick this week- “Steve Mumford: Recent Paintings,” at Postmasters (Through June 18)

For Steve Mumford, the politics of war are personal. As an artist embedded with the U.S. military over a ten-year period in both Afghanistan and Iraq, Mumford creates latter-day history painting for latter-day conflicts. His focus is not on some triumphant leader crossing the Alps but the full range of people caught up in the tide of war.

Campx-ray_lg
Steve Mumford, "Trisha and Brian at Camp X-Ray, Guantanamo," 2016, oil on canvas, 120 x 192 inches (10 x 16 feet)

Now at Postmasters through June 18, Mumford is showing his latest compositions—drawn from numerous field studies—that tell their stories in a scale ranging from the small to the cinematic.

Looking for the tiniest clues—from the details of clothing to one’s pose and expression—Mumford’s photorealism brings the unseen people of war into sharper focus than any photograph.

Femalebarracks_study_lg
Steve Mumford, "Female Barracks (study)," 2016, oil on linen, 24 x 24 inches

A Great Day in Bushwick

BUSHWICK DOCUMENTATION PROJECT from James Kalm on Vimeo.

James writes: It was a great day in Bushwick on Saturday as over seventy five artists, gallerists, journalists, and organizers joined photographer Meryl Meisler and me at Stout Projects to take part in the Bushwick Documentation Project. A big thank you to Hyperallergic, Bushwick Daily, and Bedford & Bowery for helping to spread the word of this all-inclusive open call. Meryl's photographs and my writing of this great day will appear in our exhibition at Stout Projects over Bushwick Open Studios in October 2016. In the meantime, here is some documentation of the documentation including a great video by James Kalm

 

 

Outtake: Bushwick Documentation Project. @merylmeisler @paulbehnke @robinlstout

A photo posted by James Panero (@jamespanero) on

 

Outtake: Bushwick Documentation Project. @merylmeisler @paulbehnke @robinlstout

A photo posted by James Panero (@jamespanero) on

 

We all know that Bushwick Open Studios is slated for October this year rather its customary first-weekend-in-June dateline, but that doesn't mean that the organization that puts it all together, Arts in Bushwick, is idle this weekend. Today, for instance, was a huge photo session helmed by the champion photographer and storied documentarian of Bushwick, Meryl Meisler, and her critical counterpart in Bushwick-art-ography, the writer James Panero. They were the patient ringleaders of a shoot involving scores of BOS veterans and local gallerists for AiB's ambitious book project, now nearly wrapped up. Lots of familiar faces, lots more who surely should've been there. A few kids and twice as many dogs. All in front of and upstairs at host gallery Stout Projects. And all very fun. Meryl, center here, is a photographic—and photogenic—ringleader par excellence. Also of note: Tomorrow is Bushwick Community Day in Irving Park. With a bit of transposition, AiB could stand for 'Anything But Inactive.' An active weekend for AiB, for sure. And a big hats off to James and Meryl for pulling off today's shoot with such apparent ease. @artsinbushwick @merylmeisler @jamespanero @bibibrazil @stoutprojects #nycart #brooklynart #bushwickart #bushwickopenstudios #artsinbushwick #bushwickdocumentationproject #photoshoot #jamespanero #merylmeisler #bushwickartgalleries #bushwickartists

A photo posted by Paul D'Agostino (@postuccio) on